Archive of: Profiles Teaser for ASR

Title Issue
D’Natalin IV

D’Natalin IV

In the early 2000s, a couple of shipyards in the Pacific Northwest began refining the traditional hand lay-up process of composite boat construction by implementing a vacuum infusion method, whereby negative pressure is applied to extract air and at the same time impregnate the mold with resin. Vancouver, Wash.-based Christensen Shipyards was one of those innovators.

American Ship Review 2015
HOS Commander

HOS Commander

Two years ago, Hornbeck Offshore Services sparked a flurry of blockbuster shipbuilding deals on the Gulf Coast when it announced that it planned to build 16 U.S.-flagged DP-2 offshore supply vessels in the 300-foot range at a cost estimated at $720 million.

American Ship Review 2014
‪Seacor Lynx

‪Seacor Lynx

Capt. Ron Rainey has driven high-speed cats for Seacor Marine in Angola, the Congo and the Caspian Sea. But as he takes Seacor Lynx down the Houma Navigation Canal for sea trials in the Gulf of Mexico, it feels like crew boat heaven.

American Ship Review 2014
Sikuliaq

Sikuliaq

Marinette Marine is finally delivering what the American scientific community has always wanted: its own purpose-built research vessel that can sail through ice in the Arctic.

American Ship Review 2014
USNS Montford Point

USNS Montford Point

With USNS Montford Point, the first Mobile Landing Platform (MLP) for the U.S. Navy, General Dynamics Nassco has pulled off the remarkable feat of rethinking an existing commercial design and adapting it as a naval auxiliary that can be reconfigured for multiple missions — all for about $500 million per ship.

American Ship Review 2014
Harbour Island

Harbour Island

When Newcastle Shipyards was approached to build Harbour Island, the brief was simple: build a go-anywhere, finely finished, charter-ready yacht with a shallow draft.

American Ship Review 2013
Murden

Murden

Throughout history, shifting dirt from one place to another has consumed much of man’s energy and intelligence, resulting in ingenious, sometimes cruel, and often inventive solutions to the problem of moving huge quantities of material. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers moves a lot of dirt, and it has designed a new dredge with which to do it.

American Ship Review 2013
Aiviq: Pride of Shell’s Alaskan drilling fleet

Aiviq: Pride of Shell’s Alaskan drilling fleet

2013 Ship of the Year

American Ship Review 2013
Dixie 320

Dixie 320

American Ship Review 2012

Bernard C. Webber

American Ship Review 2012
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