Archive of: American Ship Review

Title Issue
Arcticus, crew hold the line on stormy Lake Huron

Arcticus, crew hold the line on stormy Lake Huron

On a windswept day in June, the 78-foot Arcticus left the dock on Thunder Bay River in Alpena, Mich., made its way past Alpena Light and proceeded on a four-hour run to the middle of Lake Huron.

American Ship Review 2016

Arcticus specifications

American Ship Review 2016
Crew/supply boats

Crew/supply boats

“It’s quiet out there. Too quiet,” said John Wayne as he peered into the night in an old Western. That quote could be written into a present-day movie script with a shipyard owner looking out over the Gulf of Mexico.

American Ship Review 2016
Ferries/excursion

Ferries/excursion

The dream of North American ferries powered by liquefied natural gas (LNG) became a reality in 2015 with the arrival and launch of the first such vessels in the St. Lawrence River — one built overseas and one produced by Quebec’s Davie Shipyard.

American Ship Review 2016
Fire/pilot/patrol

Fire/pilot/patrol

While demand for newbuilds to service the U.S. oil patch hit the pause button in 2015, security never sleeps.

American Ship Review 2016
Research/survey

Research/survey

What will climate change mean for the shipbuilding industry?

American Ship Review 2016
Megayachts

Megayachts

by Rebecca Cahilly Despite a notable increase in 60-meter-plus contracts being signed by European yacht builders, production remains slow at most U.S. yards — and nonexistent at some.

American Ship Review 2016

Top 50 index 2016

American Ship Review 2016
Riding high on the petroleum revolution

Riding high on the petroleum revolution

Propelled by surging domestic oil and gas production, the U.S. shipbuilding industry is in a position unthinkable during the doldrums of the recession. With order books brimming and liquefied natural gas ushering in a new age of shipping, whispers of overcapacity are being trumped by the sound of hulls hitting the water.

American Ship Review 2015
Military work advances in shadow of sequestration, D.C. gridlock

Military work advances in shadow of sequestration, D.C. gridlock

While the U.S. petroleum boom holds the promise of greater gains on the commercial side for American shipbuilders, the outlook isn’t as bright for military orders.

American Ship Review 2015
Edit Module
Advertisement